Saturday, November 26, 2016

Deals Widen Cooperation with Key Suppliers Airbus, Lockheed Martin

Chile's Ministry of Defense has signed cooperation agreements with two of its most important providers of military hardware. In one accord, the Air Force's Enaer aerospace company formed a partnership with Airbus to increase business opportunities for both companies in production and maintenance of aircraft and space programs. The agreement gives Enaer a measure of prestige by aligning itself with one of the top aviation companies in the world. Enaer has struggled to build its business, which has been primarily to serve as the maintenance arm of FACh. Airbus has made sales to Chile of C-235, C-295, a satellite and helicopters. Chile also has reached an agreement with Lockheed Martin to produce spare parts for the C-130 Hercules tactical transport planes. Chile operates five or six C-130s, including at least two that were transferred from U.S. stockpiles. Chile Navy uses Lockheed's P-3 Orion maritime reconnaissance airplane (which Lockheed is updating to a mid-life upgrade), and the F-16 forms the backbone of Chile's fighter force. FACh also is acquiring a half-dozen Black Hawk helicopters from Sikorsky, a division of Lockheed.

Saturday, November 12, 2016

Chile Widens Military Ties with U.S.

The defense chiefs of the U.S. and Chile have signed a cooperation agreement, the latest step in a relationship that already has grown quite close between the two nations. The accord paves the way for research, development, testing and evaluation of defense projects. Already, Chile is one of the closest military allies of the U.S. in Latin America. The two countries operate a training center for peacekeeping missions in Chile, and there are frequent joint exercises. Chile's military is increasingly modeling itself after the U.S. and NATO, to the point that it can be viewed as an extension of U.S. military power. In the event of hostilities, Chile would have a lot of compatibility with their American counterparts, making it easy to operate jointly in a battlefield of the future. U.S. officials view such relationships as not only a projection of force, but also as a way to blunt the influence of rivals. China's military, for instance, has been making inroads with some Latin governments. Russia has clients for its weapons systems in Peru, Venezuela and other countries.